Tag Archives: learning

Keynote for Estonian library directors summer school: Public libraries: SDGs, Trends, goals, innovation and connecting with the community​.

The UNs Sustainable Development Goals played the leading role in my keynote about trends, goals and innovations that influence our world and, therefore, our communities and libraries. 
The global goals are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. While the 17 global goals are made simple, they are not always easy to understand. Libraries are essential in making the goals understandable for the public and facilitating partnerships in and with the community to actively support projects that have a tangible impact on the SDGs.
To give the global goals the focus they deserve, they should be part of your existing library strategy. 
As an example of a national public library strategy that includes the SDGs, go to the all-new Scottish library strategy: Forward.

Part of my keynote was an example of a strategy process I did about the library as a strategically important learning institution in the community and how that informed decisions like building a FabLab with a sharp library focus on the services it delivered to the public.

By doing all of the above, libraries enable communities to make smarter decisions.

To be relevant for our communities, we need to listen to all parts of the community – also the people who are not like us. We must listen actively to the people who do not visit us often or never visit us at all. That means we must get out and have honest conversations with people in the community.

When we still struggle with COVID (though times are getting better in many countries now), we must not forget that it has been a rough time for all of us – the people who visit our libraries. Compassion and sincere interest in how people are doing is a highly valued skill these days.

In the group, we discussed what we wanted to bring into the new post-COVID normal and what we wanted to leave behind in the old world.

You can see all of the trends mentioned in my slides, and here is the “worknotes” from our workshop

I promised the group to share a few links about the theme “Biased tech”. So here are the once I mentioned from New York Times:
The Week in Tech: Algorithmic Bias Is Bad. Uncovering It Is Good. [New York Times 15. November 2019]
Exposing the Bias Embedded in Tech. [New York Times 17. June 2019] 

I want to thank the National Library of Estonia for inviting me and all the participants for their contributions and kindness: Thank you for learning with me. – Please stay in touch.

Presentation “Public libraries as the learning hub in the community. Strategy and practical examples” for Conferência Internacional: [Re]Pensar a Biblioteca Pública

Thank you participants in Aveiro and online for your feedback and positivity. I was honored to be part of your wonderful conference.

Public libraries are about providing access to information for all citizens. They are also about giving the community members the best possibilities to transform that information into knowledge.

When we look at libraries not only as a place for cultural inspiration or a house full of information -but also as the learning hub in the community, we focus on different ways of connecting with the community and new ways of delivering library services. We also have a new approach to what skillset librarians need to make this happen.

In this talk, I focus on practical examples from my work as a library director in Denmark and New Zealand. Examples of working with learning as a strategy and how that impacted the library services delivered and how libraries reached out to the community.

Here are the slides:

New Horizons: How Libraries Create Smart Communities – For INFORUM 2018 in Prague

motive-en
Libraries are more important than ever. This is not the headline you see in news media these days. If there happens to be a library-related headline it often says that libraries are obsolete because of the technological development.

In a world where there is more information than ever before and where modern societies compete to get the attractive knowledge jobs librarians and libraries guide people towards digital literacy thereby empowering them as digital citizens and lifelong learners. Therefore libraries are strategically important for modern knowledge societies.

Aligning to the conference theme Different Perspectives, New Horizons Jan shares how a library strategy with a focus on learning lead to opening a library FabLab and what implications it has for supporting learning about new technology and creating new knowledge communities.

A library FabLab must have the focus on digital literacy, searching and evaluating information and actively supporting the creation of new knowledge just like the library does with more traditional media.

Jan also shares insights on European library advocacy from Public Libraries 2020 and the Library Advocacy Lab on how libraries change lives and he reveals the secret on how Public Libraries 2020 will be a driving force in creating a global knowledge school for forward-thinking librarians and why that is important.

 

Upcoming keynote: Different perspectives – New horizons. 24th annual Inforum conference in Prague

motive-enIt is always interesting to bring different kinds of perspectives and disciplines together. That is what The INFORUM conference does and I am looking very much forward to giving a keynote at this years conference and to participate and learn from the other professionals attending. INFORUM focuses on electronic information resources and their professional use in science, research, education and business. It is a unique event of its kind in Central and Eastern Europe.

It is designed for librarians from academic and public libraries, managers, researchers, doctors, university teachers, ICT specialists, public administration employees, students, and other people interested in the issue. Since 2003, INFORUM has expanded its territorial focus from the Czech Republic and Slovakia to include other Central and Eastern European countries.

Last year 420 participants were registered at INFORUM, 30 papers and 10 posters were delivered and 21 companies presented their products at the exhibition. Find more information about previous INFORUM conferences on the statistics page.

I am also looking forward to meeting up with Marydee Ojala again and to hear her keynote at the conference. I will keep you updated on my learnings from INFORUM.

Libraries: The best possible shared space today and beyond for #SCLRevitalise

Thank you for the invitation to this wonderful conference. What a couple of days of learning, sharing, crying, laughing and… singing 🙂

What skills do libraries and librarians need to be a driving force in creating smart communities?
How can we use strategy to advocate for the importance that we know we have for peoples lives?
These questions and more are part of this presentation. A few humble answers too.

Keynote for #CILIPS16: Making communities smarter through connections

20140311-154338.jpgThe theme of this years CILIPS conference is “Making connections”. I am proud to do todays morning keynote.

Libraries are strategically important for modern knowledge societies. In the library people of all ages have a safe space for learning and exchanging ideas. In the knowledge economy where communities, regions and countries compete for knowledge jobs libraries are essential in actively supporting life long learning for all. Libraries facilitae connections between people and their knowledge. Thereby libraries are making their communities smarter.

Here are my slides:

Another project joins the 23 Mobile Things family

23It is always a very special thing for me to learn about a new version of 23 Mobile Things. This week 7 Mobile Things (7 Mobiele Dingen) from the Netherlands joined the 23 family.

The new version adds academic libraries to the project and is primarily aimed at familiarizing the library staff at Universitaire Bibliotheken Leiden with using mobile devices to gather and process scholarly information. Selected themes are “Collecting and sharing”, “Privacy” and “Reference managers”. This makes 7 Mobile Things true to the 23 vision: to explore the potential of mobile tools to deliver library services.

We have proudly added the project to our list of 23 Mobile Things versions and I want to thank Universitaire Bibliotheken Leiden and Mieneke van der Salm for doing this wonderful job with the academic version in Dutch.

23 Mobile Things is now available in 14 different versions in 7 different languages with an estimated number of around 20.000 participants world wide.

Ignite – Next Library: From global inspiration to local action

At #nextlibrary2015 I did an Ignite talk about global librarianship. I shared the vision that in a world where countries compete on knowledge to get knowledge jobs – life long learning is valuable. Therefore libraries are more important than ever.
We need to know how people learn, unlearn and relearn – and we need to have our own agenda about how we learn on a global level so we can be one step ahead as information professionals – and be even better to support the learning of our communities.

By being inspired globally we learn different answers to the challenges we all face as libraries – and we can translate our inspiration into acting locally in our communities – to make our communities smarter.

The examples I shared was Buy India a Library where four information professionals (Including yours truly) set up a crowdfunding project to build a library attached to a school in Mysore, India. More than 100 wonderfully generous people from all over the globe supported our effort – so though we (at that time) we enabled people to fund a brand new library.

23 Mobile Things took the inspiration from the original 23 Things project and transformed it into a learning program for information professionals with the scope to explore the potential of mobile tools for delivering library services. It was a local project for the staff at Guldborgsund Public Library and we then turned it into a global learning project in cooperation with State Library of New South Wales (with my wonderful colleagues Mylee Joseph and Kathryn Barwick). Today there are several English language versions in USA, Australia / New Zealand, Singapore and the Philippines and versions in German, French, Russian, Norwegian and Danish.
At Guldborgsund Public Library we have just launched a version of the program with 16 Mobile Things for the public (in cooperation with Kalundborg Public Library) (New blog post coming up soon!)

Thank you for feedback to everyone at Next Library – and thank you to all the people I connected and learned with and who shared your time and knowledge with me.

The Ignite presentation format is very challenging. 5 minutes – 20 slides advancing automatically after 15 seconds.

Learning as strategy and 23 mobile things – Workshop at SLNSW

State Library of New South Wales
What is the first good idea you will steal and use in your library? This is one of the questions a buzzing room full of motivated and skilled public librarians discussed at a two-hour workshop at the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney on June 9th. Other themes were what new skills our profession needs and what focus we should have as a profession to actively support leaning in our communities. We also talked about what new skill is on our own bucket list of things we want to learn in the near future.

I think it is very important that we as library professionals are active learners ourselves and that we have a plan for our own learning. This is another way of thinking of ourselves as learning professionals – and I believe it will sharpen our focus on the learning needs of our communities as well. I therefore recommend professional development programs like 23 Mobile Things (Proudly developed in cooperation with State Library of New South Wales own Mylee Jospeh and Kathryn Barwick)

One of the things I will be inspired by in the near future is this very interesting Lifelong Learning Strategy from the City of Canterbury
This is a very good example of a learning strategy that has focus on the community and communicates the importance of the library as an active strategic learning institution to both citizens and the political level.

Another document that was referred to at the workshop is this interesting article from New Zealand about adult learning (Thank you for sharing Michelle)

The more than 60 participants in the workshop had interesting ideas about working together with museums to share the knowledge they have about our communities in new and inventive ways within a library frame – New contacts will be made.
Ideas about how we reach the young people who lack digital skills by talking to the digital skills they actually already have were also a very interesting discussion.
We also shared experiences about makerspaces and agreed that it is more about sharing knowledge and creating stuff together than it is about technology.

Thank you to all of you who participated in the workshop. I was glad to have the opportunity to present my mindset about Global Librarianship for you – and to learn with you during our interesting discussions. I appreciate your feedback and your strong participation – it was a real pleasure to work with you.

And remember: Libraries make their communities smarter.

My slides:

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This work by Jan Holmquist is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A librarian walks into a bar…

Jan Holmquist VALA Melbourne

A Friday evening in a bar in Melbourne, Australia. More than 60 librarians is gathered to have a good conversation about libraries, professional development, learning and stealing good ideas!

I was proud to do the keynote this evening about Global Librarianship and 23 Mobile Things, Gamifiction, Buy India a Library – and the amazing Dr. V. – and it was wonderful to meet you all. Talk with 23 Mobile Things participants, and highly motivated library professionals – and share a beer with you after “The concert”.

Thanks for your highly appreciated fantastic feedback – and for the invitation.