Category Archives: Librarypower

Libraries and Skills in Denmark

This infographic gives a fine introduction to Public Libraries in Denmark in a European Union context when it comes to literacy and skills.

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The Infographic is made by Public Libraries 2020 and Danmarks Biblioteksforening.

You might also like the “Libraries Change Lives” infograhic.

Library Stuff… I respectfully disagree

I read this post by my friend and inspiration Justin Hoenke. I know that Justin doesn’t like to be an inspiration in that way, but he is awesome, and I have learned so much from his projects and the way he is an awesome human being. So Justin, please forgive me for respectfully disagreeing with some parts of your latest blog post and for admiring you.
I know that you will like that we are having a conversation ūüôā
Jan and Justin

First, there is a lot of stuff in Justin’s post that I agree with as well. I agree that the library magic is in the meaningful conversations we are facilitating and having with our communities. Having shiny new stuff should never be the focus but by having this new technology we provide access and help people learn about new technology and thereby we are making a valuable democratic difference in our communities. This is amplified if we can have the conversations with our communities about how the technology can have a positive impact on the community.

My favorite 3D printing example so far is a project Copenhagen Libraries did with the theme “space”. School kids were going to 3D print a planet. Some chose colourful planets with lots of craters from a well-known big website for sharing print files. Others chose planets from NASA’s website.
This generated wonderful conversations about space, science and information literacy because just as in a normal search it is valuable to be critical of the sources from where you get your results. The planets from NASAs homepage was more accurate to what we know about the planets. This was a great learning experience for the kids and a great way to have conversations about space.
I am totally stealing that project, because I think it will be valuable to my community, and I am proud to be inspired by Copenhagen Libraries.

I think libraries should be inspired by each other and steal each others projects world-wide. That is what I call global librarianship.
An important point in global librarianship is that you can’t directly steal a project. You have to translate it in a way that fits your own community, and not all cool projects can do just that.
I also agree with Justin that we should be inspired by stuff from outside the library field, and as I am writing this I am listening to Tusk by Fleetwod Mac that Justin recommended. What a great song!

By the way. One of my favourite library programs is still Justin’s Hip Hop workshop program from back in the days, where teens made their own music. We could do something similar at my library but definitely not a complete copy, because the community is very different.

I hope you will forgive me for keep on looking up to other librarians like you, Justin. I have to! You inspire me. Thank you.

Gamification and libraries: Tools and examples

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Gamification can be a tool for libraries to engage and motivate the public to use the library – but like all other tools it is not a quick fix and must be used wisely.

In this article I share some tools and practical examples of how they have been used in libraries.

Storytelling:

Narratives are powerful. This is no secret to the library profession. The narrative element is also very important in games and is a way to engage people in the game.
Several gamification projects in libraries use this element. It is often combined with the game element Quest. A quest is the part of the story where you must solve some mysteries or puzzles to unlock more of the story.

Hidden Treasures:  A quest from Guldborgsund Public Library:

Guldborgsund Public Library invites local citizens and visitors of the city on interactive walks around the town as part of the project Hidden Treasures. Through their smart phone, ‚Äėtreasure hunters‚Äô can have a new and different experience of the town and its history.

With the project Hidden Treasures Guldborgsund Public Library wants to meet people in the urban space in a fun and engaging way. The aim is to turn the local cultural and literary history into a vivid experience. Through a series of riddles and problems, the inquisitive-minded will hopefully see the town in a new light.

The interactive walks offer three different themes: a trip back to explorer and author Peter Freuchen’s Nyk√łbing Falster in the 1920s; an insight into the town when author Knud Romer grew up in the 1970s; and a contemporary tour with focus on local food from Falster.

Gamification elements used:

Narrative:
Each walk follows a narrative of a cultural person’s history and universe giving the participants knowledge about the city’s history and literary history as the walk and the story unfold.

Quest:
Each city walk is build up with a number of challenges you have to meet to move on in the walk and the story.

Progression:
There is a clear structure on the route of the walks and the game gives feedback on how people progress through the story.

Feedback:
The choices the players make trigger feedback from the game. “Great – The answer was correct. Continue towards the water tower to get the last question of your journey”

Leader boards:
Weekly leader boards at the library

Rewards:
People get a badge at the library when they finish the walk. All the walks end at the library.

Read more about Hidden Treasures at Tame The Web or visit the official site (in Danish)

Now for another example of a quest. This time from Singapore:

Quest of the Celestial Dragon:

Quest is a narrative written on the backside of beautifully illustrated collectible cards done in the same style as Japanese manga comics. The project’s vision is to make reading fun for kids through a game experience as opposed to forced reading like homework.

The cards are based on a story, titled Quest of the Celestial Dragon. It is a fantasy story where our protagonist, Ethan has the task to retrieve the eyes of a dragon statue and free the people of that world from evil doers who threaten to plunder them of their magic and culture. Already sounds exciting, right?

When you borrow books you get cards as a reward. When you collect all 60 cards you can read the whole story. The cards can also be used as trading cards since each card has points and power values. The project became a huge success since children encouraged each other to collect cards.

The NLB of Singapore also build upon Quest and arranged a writing competition and a drawing competition. Furthermore they had a dedicated website with extra downloads of drawings from the manga universe of Quest.

Thousands of children participated and millions of cards found the ways to the happy game players and readers making the project a huge success in engaging the children of Singapore to use the library.

Unfortunately the project is now off the web and it is hard to find a good link for further reading.

Gamification elements used:

Achievements:
Achievements reward the participants skills, luck or social interaction with other players. In Quest it rewards participation as you get cards each time you borrow a book, and the cards help you progress in the story.

Rewards:
The beautiful cards.

Progression:
Collect them all – get the whole story.

Narrative:
The story unfolds as a fantastic fantasy tale about good and evil and all other elements of a classic story and within a beautifully illustrated manga universe.

International Breakfast – At Aarhus Public Library DOKK1

‚ÄúInternational Breakfast‚ÄĚ is a service where foreign families are invited to eat breakfast together in the library, to have an experience with other newcomers and hopefully build a better network in the city.

Gamification was tested on the service as a method to create a greater desire among the participants to share knowledge, talk and have fun ‚Äď together. There was a need to do this because the experience was that few participate did build new networks at the events.

Gamification elements used:

Competition:
Competition is a powerful gamification element. By participating in the game using skills or knowledge people can measure themselves against other teams or players.
In Aarhus the teams did compete on knowledge and it was made visual how well each team did with the Leader board of big soft LEGO bricks.

Cooperation:
Some challenges can only be solved (or be solved better) when you cooperate with other players. Teams cooperate to progress in the game or to beat other teams as in this case from Aarhus.
Cooperation was a powerful gamification tool to reach the goal of more social interaction between the participants in the international breakfast.

Feedback:
Visual feedback was used when each team got big LEGO bricks for each point to build a tower representing their status in the game.

What is in it for libraries?
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Gamification will appeal to people who like the game environments. Of course this is a very diverse group but since libraries often present themselves in a non-gamified way this approach can inspire and engage citizens that do not normally use the library.
Therefore it is important that both the game design is very good and also that the things that are gamified are relevant for the people experiencing the gamified library service and the library’s core tasks and mission.

The gamified library service is a story that wants to be told. It is often not aligned with the way media usually speaks about libraries, so it is a way to create a new narrative about our creative and inspiring libraries.

It is also a lot of fun. You will learn a lot and so will the rest of the staff at your library, and it is a way to actively support learning in the community in a fun and engaging way.

If you have a favorite example of a library gamification project please share it with me, and tell me more about your own projects for the updated version of this blog post. And remember: it is perfectly safe to try this at home. Have fun!

My slides from a presentation in Madrid, Spain: 15th December 2015 for: VIII Jornada Profesional de la Red De Bibliotecas del Instituto Cervantes: ¬ęGamificaci√≥n: el arte de aplicar el juego en la biblioteca¬Ľ

 

If the library was a music genre…

bossa

I am inspired by this Bossa Nova song from the wonderful people at The Royal Library of Denmark – The Faculty Library of Social Sciences

In fact I am inspired by most things they do… Their LEGO stop motion movies and music would still be cool even if did not have the underlying message to the students that the library is there to make them information ninjas.

Listen – enjoy the Bossa and share it with your favorite library lovers…

And if you are so inclined – and can stand a little library industrial – re-listen¬† my avantgarde song – Go to the library ūüôā

Credits for Go to the library
Written, produced, mixed, all instruments and vocals: Jan Holmquist

Lost in your time (at the library) is probably the first bossa nova library song in the world. Made by Los Bossa Bibliotheca and publiched by Go To The Library Records / Faculty Library of Social Sciences

Credits – for Lost in your time (at the library):
Guitar – Jens Stein J√łrgensen
Vocals – Simon Roland Pedersen
Percussion – Rasmus Rindom Riis
Double bass – Ida Duelund Hansen
Lyrics – Anders Bonatto Fisker
Producer, mixer and sound wizard – Mads Korsgaard
Bossa boss and executive producer – Christian Lauersen
Head groupie РStine Agerbæk
Layout – Rasmus Rindom Riise

Libraries Change Lives

There are 65000 libraries in Europe welcoming more than 100 million people each year. That is an amazing knowledge infrastructure to make our communities smarter.
In this short video some of these statistics and core values are shared.
Libraries connect people and their knowledge  Рand support learning and knowledge creation.

Spend 90 seconds watching this video to celebrate and highlight the difference libraries make everyday across Europe and the rest of the world.
Libraries change lives.

The video is published by Public Libraries 2020 and The Reading & Writing Foundation. It is also strongly approved by the Library Avengers.

100 years old today – Guldborgsund Public Library

Today is a very special day. In November 1913¬†local politicians decided to open¬†a public reading room in Nyk√łbing Falster thereby making the decision and providing the funds that made it possible to open the doors to the first public library in the city 100 years ago today.

As the city’s most used cultural organisation we are proud to provide cultural experiences, learning environments, knowledge sharing and knowledge creation, debate and much more to our community. Today – and for the next 100 years to come.

We celebrate today with the rest of the city. There will be a lot of music, there will be storytime, there will be children’s theatre, book talks etc. – and there will be cake.

If you want to follow along we will be documenting the day on our Instagram profile

Welcome to the #23mobilethings family Alaska

I am very proud to welcome another 23 mobile things program to the #23mobilethings familiy РWelcome Alaska #23mobilethingsAK. You are joining thousands of fellow libraraians and library staff from all over the planet in this co-learning opportunity. I wish you all a great learning experience РHere is my welcome video.

Learn more about 23 Mobile Things Alska
Thank you Daniel Cornwall (@DanielCornwall) for your contribution to keeping this learning program alive.