Category Archives: global librarianship

Libraries and their communities – an interview.

Should-a-public-library-be-more-community-focused

Libraries are all about the communities they serve. At the heart of Global Librarianship is the combination of global inspiration and local action. I was interviewed about community focused libraries for the Princh blog.

Here is a small sample 🙂

What is the definition of a library nowadays?
The library is the community’s hub for learning and knowledge creation. Libraries simply make communities smarter. In a world with more and more information librarians and libraries are vital, because they have access to and know how to distribute the right information and knowledge to the citizens in the knowledge economy.

You can read the whole interview here.

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New member of the International Advisory Board for San Jose State University, Center for Information Research & Innovation.

img_1384I am humbled and proud to announce that I have joined the International Advisory Board for San Jose State University, Center for Information Research & Innovation. I am looking forward to contributing to the boards work.

The Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI) is organized around numerous research areas, including:

  • Digital Records and Curation Includes archives, records management, depositories, digitization, preservation
  • Information Access and Use Includes informatics, information behaviors, organization of information, information services
  • LIS Online Learning Includes online delivery methods, components of successful online delivery, online readiness, LIS education, MLIS skills
  • New Literacies and Learning Includes digital, visual and information literacy, reading, literature in multiple formats
  • Management and Leadership Includes libraries as organizations, as physical and virtual places, marketing, advocacy, leadership
  • Social Dynamics of Information Includes historical and contemporary topics relating to information and society
  • Technological Innovation and Change Includes impact of emerging trends and technologies on library and information services

The work of the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI) is guided by an international advisory board of leading researchers from the academy, government and industry. The board meets regularly to discuss research and professional issues requiring attention, to assess the role and impact of CIRI to date and to recommend priorities for development and resource allocation. For more, see full profiles of the board members.

Keynote for #CILIPS16: Making communities smarter through connections

20140311-154338.jpgThe theme of this years CILIPS conference is “Making connections”. I am proud to do todays morning keynote.

Libraries are strategically important for modern knowledge societies. In the library people of all ages have a safe space for learning and exchanging ideas. In the knowledge economy where communities, regions and countries compete for knowledge jobs libraries are essential in actively supporting life long learning for all. Libraries facilitae connections between people and their knowledge. Thereby libraries are making their communities smarter.

Here are my slides:

Library Stuff… I respectfully disagree

I read this post by my friend and inspiration Justin Hoenke. I know that Justin doesn’t like to be an inspiration in that way, but he is awesome, and I have learned so much from his projects and the way he is an awesome human being. So Justin, please forgive me for respectfully disagreeing with some parts of your latest blog post and for admiring you.
I know that you will like that we are having a conversation 🙂
Jan and Justin

First, there is a lot of stuff in Justin’s post that I agree with as well. I agree that the library magic is in the meaningful conversations we are facilitating and having with our communities. Having shiny new stuff should never be the focus but by having this new technology we provide access and help people learn about new technology and thereby we are making a valuable democratic difference in our communities. This is amplified if we can have the conversations with our communities about how the technology can have a positive impact on the community.

My favorite 3D printing example so far is a project Copenhagen Libraries did with the theme “space”. School kids were going to 3D print a planet. Some chose colourful planets with lots of craters from a well-known big website for sharing print files. Others chose planets from NASA’s website.
This generated wonderful conversations about space, science and information literacy because just as in a normal search it is valuable to be critical of the sources from where you get your results. The planets from NASAs homepage was more accurate to what we know about the planets. This was a great learning experience for the kids and a great way to have conversations about space.
I am totally stealing that project, because I think it will be valuable to my community, and I am proud to be inspired by Copenhagen Libraries.

I think libraries should be inspired by each other and steal each others projects world-wide. That is what I call global librarianship.
An important point in global librarianship is that you can’t directly steal a project. You have to translate it in a way that fits your own community, and not all cool projects can do just that.
I also agree with Justin that we should be inspired by stuff from outside the library field, and as I am writing this I am listening to Tusk by Fleetwod Mac that Justin recommended. What a great song!

By the way. One of my favourite library programs is still Justin’s Hip Hop workshop program from back in the days, where teens made their own music. We could do something similar at my library but definitely not a complete copy, because the community is very different.

I hope you will forgive me for keep on looking up to other librarians like you, Justin. I have to! You inspire me. Thank you.

Ignite – Next Library: From global inspiration to local action

At #nextlibrary2015 I did an Ignite talk about global librarianship. I shared the vision that in a world where countries compete on knowledge to get knowledge jobs – life long learning is valuable. Therefore libraries are more important than ever.
We need to know how people learn, unlearn and relearn – and we need to have our own agenda about how we learn on a global level so we can be one step ahead as information professionals – and be even better to support the learning of our communities.

By being inspired globally we learn different answers to the challenges we all face as libraries – and we can translate our inspiration into acting locally in our communities – to make our communities smarter.

The examples I shared was Buy India a Library where four information professionals (Including yours truly) set up a crowdfunding project to build a library attached to a school in Mysore, India. More than 100 wonderfully generous people from all over the globe supported our effort – so though we (at that time) we enabled people to fund a brand new library.

23 Mobile Things took the inspiration from the original 23 Things project and transformed it into a learning program for information professionals with the scope to explore the potential of mobile tools for delivering library services. It was a local project for the staff at Guldborgsund Public Library and we then turned it into a global learning project in cooperation with State Library of New South Wales (with my wonderful colleagues Mylee Joseph and Kathryn Barwick). Today there are several English language versions in USA, Australia / New Zealand, Singapore and the Philippines and versions in German, French, Russian, Norwegian and Danish.
At Guldborgsund Public Library we have just launched a version of the program with 16 Mobile Things for the public (in cooperation with Kalundborg Public Library) (New blog post coming up soon!)

Thank you for feedback to everyone at Next Library – and thank you to all the people I connected and learned with and who shared your time and knowledge with me.

The Ignite presentation format is very challenging. 5 minutes – 20 slides advancing automatically after 15 seconds.

A short introduction to International Librarians Network

BatJan
I talk a lot about Global Librarianship because I think it is a very useful model to make things happen in our communities. My definition is that Global Librarianship is when you are inspired by global projects from both within the library world and from other fields and you translate that inspiration into making a difference in the community your library serves.

One of the many ways to get started with a more global view on the profession is to join the International Librarians Network – The biggest peer mentoring program in our field. I am a big fan of the program – and the new short promo video is wonderful ! So use a minute of your life to see if the program can be of interest to you.

Connect and learn with library professionals from another country.

Visit ILN website to learn more.

Learning as strategy and 23 mobile things – Workshop at SLNSW

State Library of New South Wales
What is the first good idea you will steal and use in your library? This is one of the questions a buzzing room full of motivated and skilled public librarians discussed at a two-hour workshop at the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney on June 9th. Other themes were what new skills our profession needs and what focus we should have as a profession to actively support leaning in our communities. We also talked about what new skill is on our own bucket list of things we want to learn in the near future.

I think it is very important that we as library professionals are active learners ourselves and that we have a plan for our own learning. This is another way of thinking of ourselves as learning professionals – and I believe it will sharpen our focus on the learning needs of our communities as well. I therefore recommend professional development programs like 23 Mobile Things (Proudly developed in cooperation with State Library of New South Wales own Mylee Jospeh and Kathryn Barwick)

One of the things I will be inspired by in the near future is this very interesting Lifelong Learning Strategy from the City of Canterbury
This is a very good example of a learning strategy that has focus on the community and communicates the importance of the library as an active strategic learning institution to both citizens and the political level.

Another document that was referred to at the workshop is this interesting article from New Zealand about adult learning (Thank you for sharing Michelle)

The more than 60 participants in the workshop had interesting ideas about working together with museums to share the knowledge they have about our communities in new and inventive ways within a library frame – New contacts will be made.
Ideas about how we reach the young people who lack digital skills by talking to the digital skills they actually already have were also a very interesting discussion.
We also shared experiences about makerspaces and agreed that it is more about sharing knowledge and creating stuff together than it is about technology.

Thank you to all of you who participated in the workshop. I was glad to have the opportunity to present my mindset about Global Librarianship for you – and to learn with you during our interesting discussions. I appreciate your feedback and your strong participation – it was a real pleasure to work with you.

And remember: Libraries make their communities smarter.

My slides:

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This work by Jan Holmquist is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.