Category Archives: workshop

Keynote for Estonian library directors summer school: Public libraries: SDGs, Trends, goals, innovation and connecting with the community​.

The UNs Sustainable Development Goals played the leading role in my keynote about trends, goals and innovations that influence our world and, therefore, our communities and libraries. 
The global goals are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. While the 17 global goals are made simple, they are not always easy to understand. Libraries are essential in making the goals understandable for the public and facilitating partnerships in and with the community to actively support projects that have a tangible impact on the SDGs.
To give the global goals the focus they deserve, they should be part of your existing library strategy. 
As an example of a national public library strategy that includes the SDGs, go to the all-new Scottish library strategy: Forward.

Part of my keynote was an example of a strategy process I did about the library as a strategically important learning institution in the community and how that informed decisions like building a FabLab with a sharp library focus on the services it delivered to the public.

By doing all of the above, libraries enable communities to make smarter decisions.

To be relevant for our communities, we need to listen to all parts of the community – also the people who are not like us. We must listen actively to the people who do not visit us often or never visit us at all. That means we must get out and have honest conversations with people in the community.

When we still struggle with COVID (though times are getting better in many countries now), we must not forget that it has been a rough time for all of us – the people who visit our libraries. Compassion and sincere interest in how people are doing is a highly valued skill these days.

In the group, we discussed what we wanted to bring into the new post-COVID normal and what we wanted to leave behind in the old world.

You can see all of the trends mentioned in my slides, and here is the “worknotes” from our workshop

I promised the group to share a few links about the theme “Biased tech”. So here are the once I mentioned from New York Times:
The Week in Tech: Algorithmic Bias Is Bad. Uncovering It Is Good. [New York Times 15. November 2019]
Exposing the Bias Embedded in Tech. [New York Times 17. June 2019] 

I want to thank the National Library of Estonia for inviting me and all the participants for their contributions and kindness: Thank you for learning with me. – Please stay in touch.

Help us “Build a Librarian” for 21st-century information work #nextlibrary2017 #LibraryChangeAgent

20140311-154338.jpgI am very excited to be able to learn with NEXT Library conference participants in Aarhus in mid June. Together with Dr. Michael Stephens and Mylee Joseph,  I will be leading an interactive workshop at the conference and we need your input to help us make this workshop really effective for the participants at this year’s conference.

“Change” and “disruption” are not only popular buzzwords. Technology, economy and politics are forces that are changing the world as we know it and our communities at a fast pace. Libraries are embracing and responding to these changes and have different strategies for maintaining and increasing their relevance to their local communities. But to embrace change, and be a driving force for what rapidly changing communities need, librarians must have skills to both anticipate and adapt to change as well as being effective community connectors to drive change.

CHANGE

In business and leadership literature “dynamic capabilities” describes the characteristics of a firm that can adapt to changes in the environment and survive, while businesses that fail to adapt can slip from world domination to bankruptcy with examples often mentioned like KODAK and NOKIA.

In the global economy our countries, cities and communities compete on skills, know-how,  adaptability and connectivity to get knowledge jobs in their area. Communities need assistance to anticipate and adapt to the world as it changes around them. Libraries can play a vital role in providing opportunities, tools and experiences for their communities to learn and to develop the dynamic capabilities needed. Librarians as effective “community learning connectors” can be change agents and drivers for development in our communities for many years to come.
How do we insure the folks serving our varied constituents have the skill sets and attitudes required of the modern library worker.

In our workshop we will use Michael’s “formula for success” to facilitate participants own ideas:

Essential Skills + Mindset² X Support = Success

Each part of the formula is vital. The outcome does not work if any of them are removed.

What do you think:

  • What are your thoughts on the content in Michael Stephens Essential Skills + Mindset² X Support = Success
  • In what way can libraries enhance a community’s adaptability to change?
  • Do you have examples of libraries in your community acting as community learning connectors and helping to respond and adapt to change?
  • What skills are needed for library staff to be effective community learning connectors?
  • What skills and mindset will help library staff continue to adapt to rapid change into the future?

Please share your thoughts in the comments or on Twitter using the hashtag #LibraryChangeAgent  all kinds of contributions are welcome. Make a short video, use words – or draw your perfect set of skills… Be creative. We think that is one of the important skills needed 🙂

 

Learning as strategy and 23 mobile things – Workshop at SLNSW

State Library of New South Wales
What is the first good idea you will steal and use in your library? This is one of the questions a buzzing room full of motivated and skilled public librarians discussed at a two-hour workshop at the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney on June 9th. Other themes were what new skills our profession needs and what focus we should have as a profession to actively support leaning in our communities. We also talked about what new skill is on our own bucket list of things we want to learn in the near future.

I think it is very important that we as library professionals are active learners ourselves and that we have a plan for our own learning. This is another way of thinking of ourselves as learning professionals – and I believe it will sharpen our focus on the learning needs of our communities as well. I therefore recommend professional development programs like 23 Mobile Things (Proudly developed in cooperation with State Library of New South Wales own Mylee Jospeh and Kathryn Barwick)

One of the things I will be inspired by in the near future is this very interesting Lifelong Learning Strategy from the City of Canterbury
This is a very good example of a learning strategy that has focus on the community and communicates the importance of the library as an active strategic learning institution to both citizens and the political level.

Another document that was referred to at the workshop is this interesting article from New Zealand about adult learning (Thank you for sharing Michelle)

The more than 60 participants in the workshop had interesting ideas about working together with museums to share the knowledge they have about our communities in new and inventive ways within a library frame – New contacts will be made.
Ideas about how we reach the young people who lack digital skills by talking to the digital skills they actually already have were also a very interesting discussion.
We also shared experiences about makerspaces and agreed that it is more about sharing knowledge and creating stuff together than it is about technology.

Thank you to all of you who participated in the workshop. I was glad to have the opportunity to present my mindset about Global Librarianship for you – and to learn with you during our interesting discussions. I appreciate your feedback and your strong participation – it was a real pleasure to work with you.

And remember: Libraries make their communities smarter.

My slides:

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This work by Jan Holmquist is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.