Libraries and Skills in Denmark

This infographic gives a fine introduction to Public Libraries in Denmark in a European Union context when it comes to literacy and skills.

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The Infographic is made by Public Libraries 2020 and Danmarks Biblioteksforening.

You might also like the “Libraries Change Lives” infograhic.

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New member of the International Advisory Board for San Jose State University, Center for Information Research & Innovation.

img_1384I am humbled and proud to announce that I have joined the International Advisory Board for San Jose State University, Center for Information Research & Innovation. I am looking forward to contributing to the boards work.

The Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI) is organized around numerous research areas, including:

  • Digital Records and Curation Includes archives, records management, depositories, digitization, preservation
  • Information Access and Use Includes informatics, information behaviors, organization of information, information services
  • LIS Online Learning Includes online delivery methods, components of successful online delivery, online readiness, LIS education, MLIS skills
  • New Literacies and Learning Includes digital, visual and information literacy, reading, literature in multiple formats
  • Management and Leadership Includes libraries as organizations, as physical and virtual places, marketing, advocacy, leadership
  • Social Dynamics of Information Includes historical and contemporary topics relating to information and society
  • Technological Innovation and Change Includes impact of emerging trends and technologies on library and information services

The work of the Center for Information Research and Innovation (CIRI) is guided by an international advisory board of leading researchers from the academy, government and industry. The board meets regularly to discuss research and professional issues requiring attention, to assess the role and impact of CIRI to date and to recommend priorities for development and resource allocation. For more, see full profiles of the board members.

Upcoming presentations: The #ILI2016 program is out and I am one of the Keynote speakers.

ILI2016

Smart libraries create smart communities – towards a visionary strategy for libraries. This is the title for my upcoming keynote at Internet Librarian International this October in London, UK.

The aim of #ILI2016 is helping the participants make a difference to their own organization, clients and communities. It is in the conference DNA to make this happen by being a forum for sharing ideas, learning new skills, hearing about new tools and technology, making unexpected connections, discovering practical solutions and exploring new and interesting approaches to librarianship.

I am looking forward to contributing to this with my keynote in which I will share examples of modern world challenges to which libraries are the solution and highlight how this creates the foundation for a clear strategy for libraries in 2016 and beyond.

I am also looking forward to keynotes by Stuart Hamilton and Mia Ridge and to participating in the conference and engaging with all the participants. The program is packed with fine presentations from skilled library and information professionals from all over the world. Check out the full program here. I hope to see you and learn with you at #ILI2016.

Pssst… The program is also available as a PDF

Libraries on the agenda in the EU

On Monday 20th June 2016, a workshop on “The new role of public libraries” will take place during the European Parliament’s Culture (CULT) Committee meeting.  You can follow the workshop online at 3 PM CET via this link.

The workshop will examine different aspects of the role of public libraries in the knowledge society. First, how can they engage with local communities and act as anchors for the high-street? Second, how can libraries contribute to media and information literacy? And third, which models do they use to make e-books available to their patrons?

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Keynote for #CILIPS16: Making communities smarter through connections

20140311-154338.jpgThe theme of this years CILIPS conference is “Making connections”. I am proud to do todays morning keynote.

Libraries are strategically important for modern knowledge societies. In the library people of all ages have a safe space for learning and exchanging ideas. In the knowledge economy where communities, regions and countries compete for knowledge jobs libraries are essential in actively supporting life long learning for all. Libraries facilitae connections between people and their knowledge. Thereby libraries are making their communities smarter.

Here are my slides:

Library Stuff… I respectfully disagree

I read this post by my friend and inspiration Justin Hoenke. I know that Justin doesn’t like to be an inspiration in that way, but he is awesome, and I have learned so much from his projects and the way he is an awesome human being. So Justin, please forgive me for respectfully disagreeing with some parts of your latest blog post and for admiring you.
I know that you will like that we are having a conversation 🙂
Jan and Justin

First, there is a lot of stuff in Justin’s post that I agree with as well. I agree that the library magic is in the meaningful conversations we are facilitating and having with our communities. Having shiny new stuff should never be the focus but by having this new technology we provide access and help people learn about new technology and thereby we are making a valuable democratic difference in our communities. This is amplified if we can have the conversations with our communities about how the technology can have a positive impact on the community.

My favorite 3D printing example so far is a project Copenhagen Libraries did with the theme “space”. School kids were going to 3D print a planet. Some chose colourful planets with lots of craters from a well-known big website for sharing print files. Others chose planets from NASA’s website.
This generated wonderful conversations about space, science and information literacy because just as in a normal search it is valuable to be critical of the sources from where you get your results. The planets from NASAs homepage was more accurate to what we know about the planets. This was a great learning experience for the kids and a great way to have conversations about space.
I am totally stealing that project, because I think it will be valuable to my community, and I am proud to be inspired by Copenhagen Libraries.

I think libraries should be inspired by each other and steal each others projects world-wide. That is what I call global librarianship.
An important point in global librarianship is that you can’t directly steal a project. You have to translate it in a way that fits your own community, and not all cool projects can do just that.
I also agree with Justin that we should be inspired by stuff from outside the library field, and as I am writing this I am listening to Tusk by Fleetwod Mac that Justin recommended. What a great song!

By the way. One of my favourite library programs is still Justin’s Hip Hop workshop program from back in the days, where teens made their own music. We could do something similar at my library but definitely not a complete copy, because the community is very different.

I hope you will forgive me for keep on looking up to other librarians like you, Justin. I have to! You inspire me. Thank you.

World wide thoughts of a Danish librarian

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